Edible Oils

 

PEANUT OIL : 
Peanut oil, also known as groundnut oil or arachis oil, is a mild tasting vegetable oil derived from peanuts. The oil is available in refined, unrefined, cold pressed, and roasted varieties, the latter with a strong peanut flavor and aroma, analogous to sesame oil.

It is often used in Chinese, South Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine, both for general cooking, and in the case of roasted oil, for added flavor. Peanut oil has a high smoke point relative to many other cooking oils, so is commonly used for frying foods. Its major component fatty acids are oleic acid (46.8% as olein), linoleic acid (33.4% as linolein), and palmitic acid (10.0% as palmitin). The oil also contains some stearic acid, arachidic acid, arachidonic acid, behenic acid, lignoceric acid and other fatty acids.
 

peanut-oil

Nutritional value of Peanut oil per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy

3,699 kJ (884 kcal)

Carbohydrates

0 g

Fat

100 g

Saturated

17 g

Monounsaturated

46 g

Polyunsaturated

32 g

Source : USDA Nutrient Database

 

 


SESAME OIL :

Sesame oil is an edible vegetable oil derived from sesame seeds. Besides being used as a cooking oil in South India, it is often used as a flavor enhancer in Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, Korean, and Southeast Asian cuisine.

The oil from the nutrient-rich seed is popular in alternative medicine, from traditional massages and treatments to the modern day. The traditional Indian medical practice of Ayurveda uses sesame oil. 

The oil is popular in Asia and is also one of the earliest-known crop-based oils, but world-wide mass modern production continues to be limited even today due to the inefficient manual harvesting process required to extract the oil.
 

sesame-oil

Nutritional value of Sesame oil per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy

3,699 kJ (884 kcal)

Carbohydrates

0.00 g

Fat

100.00 g

Saturated

14.200 g

Monounsaturated

39.700 g

Polyunsaturated

41.700 g

Source : USDA Nutrient Database

 

 


MUSTARD AND RAPESEED OIL :
Mustard  oil has a distinctive pungent taste, characteristic of all plants in the mustard (Brassicaceae) family.It is often used for cooking in North India, Eastern India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan. In Bengal, Orissa, Assam and Nepal, it is the traditionally preferred oil for cooking. The oil makes up about 30% of the mustard seeds. It can be produced from black mustard (Brassica nigra), brown Indian mustard (B. juncea), and white mustard (B. hirta).

The characteristic pungent flavour of mustard oil is due to allylisothiocyanate. Mustard oil has about 60% monounsaturated fatty acids (42% erucic acid and 12% oleic acid); it has about 21% polyunsaturated fats (6% the omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid and 15% the omega-6 linoleic acid), and it has about 12% saturated fats.

Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is a bright-yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae.  B. napus is cultivated mainly for its oil-rich seed, the third-largest source of vegetable oil in the world.
 

mustard-rapeseed-oil

 



SUNFLOWER OIL :
Sunflower oil is the non-volatile oil compressed from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds. Sunflower oil is commonly used in food as frying oil, and in cosmetic formulations as an emollient.  The world's largest sunflower oil producers are Ukraine, Russia and Argentina.

Sunflower oil is a monounsaturated (MUFA)/polyunsaturated (PUFA) mixture of mostly oleic acid (omega-9)-linoleic acid (omega-6) group of oils.
 

Sunflower-Oil

Nutritional value of Sunflower oil per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy

3,699 kJ (884 kcal)

Carbohydrates

0.00 g

Fat

100.00 g

Saturated

9.748 g

Monounsaturated

83.594 g

Polyunsaturated

3.798 g

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

 


SAFFLOWER OIL : 
Safflower ( Carthamustinctorius) is a minor crop today, with about 600,000 tons being produced commercially in more than sixty countries worldwide. India, United States, and Mexico are the leading producers, with Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, China, the Arab World, Argentina and Australia accounting for most of the remainder.

Safflower seed oil is flavorless and colorless, and nutritionally similar to sunflower oil. It is used mainly in cosmetics and as cooking oil, in salad dressing, and for the production of margarine. It may also be taken as a nutritional supplement.

There are two types of safflower that produce different kinds of oil: one high in monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid) and the other high in polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleic acid). Currently the predominant edible oil market is for the former, which is lower in saturates than olive oil. The latter is used in painting in the place of linseed oil, particularly with white paints, as it does not have the yellow tint which linseed oil possesses.
 

safflower-oil

 


CASTOR OIL : 
Castor oil is generally a non-edible vegetable oil obtained by pressing the seeds of the castor oil plant (Ricinuscommunis). It is a triglyceride in which approximately 90 percent of fatty acid chains are ricinoleate. Oleate and linoleates are the other significant components.

Castor oil and its derivatives are used in the manufacturing of soaps, lubricants, hydraulic and brake fluids, paints, dyes, coatings, inks, cold resistant plastics, waxes and polishes, nylon, pharmaceuticals and perfumes.

Castor oil is famous as a source of ricinoleic acid, a monounsaturated, 18-carbon fatty acid. Among fatty acids, ricinoleic acid is unusual in that it has a hydroxyl functional group on the 12th carbon.

In the food industry, castor oil (food grade) is used in food additives, flavorings, candy (e.g., polyglycerolpolyricinoleate or PGPR in chocolate), as a mold inhibitor, and in packaging. Polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used in the food industries.

In India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh, food grains are preserved by applying castor oil. It stops rice, wheat, and pulses from rotting. For example the legume toor dal is commonly available coated in oil for extended storage.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has categorized castor oil as "generally recognized as safe and effective" (GRASE) for over-the-counter use as a laxative with its major site of action the small intestine where it is digested into ricinoleic acid.
 

castor-oil

 




 



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